Select Background & Text

   http://classics-illustrated.com

"The Marvelous Land of Oz"


Part VI


John R. Neill illustration for The Marvelous Land of Oz by Frank Baum depicting While they paused, hesitating and wondering, the Tin Woodman uttered a cry of impatience and advanced with swinging axe to cut down the stalks before him. But now the sunflowers suddenly stopped their rapid whirling, and the travelers plainly saw a girl's face appear in the center of each flower.

While they paused, hesitating and wondering, the Tin Woodman uttered a cry of impatience and advanced with swinging axe to cut down the stalks before him. But now the sunflowers suddenly stopped their rapid whirling, and the travelers plainly saw a girl's face appear in the center of each flower.



by L. Frank Baum


Illustrated by John R. Neill




The Marvelous
Land of Oz

Being an account of the
further adventures of the
Scarecrow
and Tin Woodman

and also the strange experiences
of the highly magnified Woggle-Bug
Jack Pumpkinhead,
the Animated Saw-Horse
and the Gump;

the story being
A Sequel to The Wizard of Oz




Part VI - The Scarecrow Takes Time to Think - The Astonishing Flight of the Gump - In the Jackdaw's Nest

"It seems to me," began the Scarecrow, when all were again assembled in the throne room, "that the girl Jinjur is quite right in claiming to be Queen. And if she is right, then I am wrong, and we have no business to be occupying her palace."
    "But you were the King until she came," said the Woggle-Bug, strutting up and down with his hands in his pockets; "so it appears to me that she is the interloper instead of you."
    "Especially as we have just conquered her and put her to flight," added the Pumpkinhead, as he raised his hands to turn his face toward the Scarecrow.
    "Have we really conquered her?" asked the Scarecrow, quietly. "Look out of the window, and tell me what you see."
    Tip ran to the window and looked out.
    "The palace is surrounded by a double row of girl soldiers," he announced.
    "I thought so," returned the Scarecrow. "We are as truly their prisoners as we were before the mice frightened them from the palace."
    "My friend is right," said Nick Chopper, who had been polishing his breast with a bit of chamois-leather. "Jinjur is still the Queen, and we are her prisoners."
    "But I hope she cannot get at us," exclaimed the Pumpkinhead, with a shiver of fear. "She threatened to make tarts of me, you know."
    "Don't worry," said the Tin Woodman. "It cannot matter greatly. If you stay shut up here you will spoil in time, anyway. A good tart is far more admirable than a decayed intellect."
    "Very true," agreed the Scarecrow.
    "Oh, dear!" moaned Jack; "what an unhappy lot is mine! Why, dear father, did you not make me out of tin -- or even out of straw -- so that I would keep indefinitely."
    "Shucks!" returned Tip, indignantly. "You ought to be glad that I made you at all." Then he added, reflectively, "everything has to come to an end, some time."
    "But I beg to remind you," broke in the Woggle-Bug, who had a distressed look in his bulging, round eyes, "that this terrible Queen Jinjur suggested making a goulash of me -- Me! the only Highly Magnified and Thoroughly Educated Woggle-Bug in the wide, wide world!"
    "I think it was a brilliant idea," remarked the Scarecrow, approvingly.
    "Don't you imagine he would make a better soup?" asked the Tin Woodman, turning toward his friend.
    "Well, perhaps," acknowledged the Scarecrow.
    The Woggle-Bug groaned.
    "I can see, in my mind's eye," said he, mournfully, "the goats eating small pieces of my dear comrade, the Tin Woodman, while my soup is being cooked on a bonfire built of the Saw-Horse and Jack Pumpkinhead's body, and Queen Jinjur watches me boil while she feeds the flames with my friend the Scarecrow!"
    This morbid picture cast a gloom over the entire party, making them restless and anxious.
   

 John R. Neill
illustration for The Marvelous Land of Oz by Frank Baum depicting 
This morbid picture cast a gloom over the entire party, making them restless and anxious.

This morbid picture cast a gloom over the entire party, making them restless and anxious.

"It can't happen for some time," said the Tin Woodman, trying to speak cheerfully; "for we shall be able to keep Jinjur out of the palace until she manages to break down the doors."
    "And in the meantime I am liable to starve to death, and so is the Woggle- Bug," announced Tip.
    "As for me," said the Woggle-Bug, "I think that I could live for some time on Jack Pumpkinhead. Not that I prefer pumpkins for food; but I believe they are somewhat nutritious, and Jack's head is large and plump."
    "How heartless!" exclaimed the Tin Woodman, greatly shocked. "Are we cannibals, let me ask? Or are we faithful friends?"
    "I see very clearly that we cannot stay shut up in this palace," said the Scarecrow, with decision. "So let us end this mournful talk and try to discover a means to escape."
    At this suggestion they all gathered eagerly around the throne, wherein was seated the Scarecrow, and as Tip sat down upon a stool there fell from his pocket a pepper-box, which rolled upon the floor.
    "What is this?" asked Nick Chopper, picking up the box.
    "Be careful!" cried the boy. "That's my Powder of Life. Don't spill it, for it is nearly gone."
    "And what is the Powder of Life?" enquired the Scarecrow, as Tip replaced the box carefully in his pocket.
    "It's some magical stuff old Mombi got from a crooked sorcerer," explained the boy. "She brought Jack to life with it, and afterward I used it to bring the Saw-Horse to life. I guess it will make anything live that is sprinkled with it; but there's only about one dose left."
    "Then it is very precious," said the Tin Woodman.
    "Indeed it is," agreed the Scarecrow. "It may prove our best means of escape from our difficulties. I believe I will think for a few minutes; so I will thank you, friend Tip, to get out your knife and rip this heavy crown from my forehead."
    Tip soon cut the stitches that had fastened the crown to the Scarecrow's head, and the former monarch of the Emerald City removed it with a sigh of relief and hung it on a peg beside the throne.
    "That is my last memento of royalty" said he; "and I'm glad to get rid of it. The former King of this City, who was named Pastoria, lost the crown to the Wonderful Wizard, who passed it on to me. Now the girl Jinjur claims it, and I sincerely hope it will not give her a headache."
    "A kindly thought, which I greatly admire," said the Tin Woodman, nodding approvingly.
    "And now I will indulge in a quiet think," continued the Scarecrow, lying back in the throne.
    The others remained as silent and still as possible, so as not to disturb him; for all had great confidence in the extraordinary brains of the Scarecrow.
    And, after what seemed a very long time indeed to the anxious watchers, the thinker sat up, looked upon his friends with his most whimsical expression, and said:
    "My brains work beautifully today. I'm quite proud of them. Now, listen! If we attempt to escape through the doors of the palace we shall surely be captured. And, as we can't escape through the ground, there is only one other thing to be done. We must escape through the air!"
    He paused to note the effect of these words; but all his hearers seemed puzzled and unconvinced.
    "The Wonderful Wizard escaped in a balloon," he continued. "We don't know how to make a balloon, of course; but any sort of thing that can fly through the air can carry us easily. So I suggest that my friend the Tin Woodman, who is a skillful mechanic, shall build some sort of a machine, with good strong wings, to carry us; and our friend Tip can then bring the Thing to life with his magical powder."
    "Bravo!" cried Nick Chopper.
    "What splendid brains!" murmured Jack.
    "Really quite clever!" said the Educated Woggle-Bug.
    "I believe it can be done," declared Tip; "that is, if the Tin Woodman is equal to making the Thing
    "I'll do my best," said Nick, cheerily; "and, as a matter of fact, I do not often fail in what I attempt. But the Thing will have to be built on the roof of the palace, so it can rise comfortably into the air."
    "To be sure," said the Scarecrow.
    "Then let us search through the palace," continued the Tin Woodman, "and carry all the material we can find to the roof, where I will begin my work."
    "First, however," said the Pumpkinhead, "I beg you will release me from this horse, and make me another leg to walk with. For in my present condition I am of no use to myself or to anyone else."
    So the Tin Woodman knocked a mahogany center-table to pieces with his axe and fitted one of the legs, which was beautifully carved, on to the body of Jack Pumpkinhead, who was very proud of the acquisition.
    "It seems strange," said he, as he watched the Tin Woodman work, "that my left leg should be the most elegant and substantial part of me."
    "That proves you are unusual," returned the Scarecrow. "and I am convinced that the only people worthy of consideration in this world are the unusual ones. For the common folks are like the leaves of a tree, and live and die unnoticed."
    "Spoken like a philosopher!" cried the Woggle-Bug, as he assisted the Tin Woodman to set Jack upon his feet.
    "How do you feel now?" asked Tip, watching
    the Pumpkinhead stump around to try his new leg."
    As good as new" answered Jack, Joyfully, "and quite ready to assist you all to escape."
    "Then let us get to work," said the Scarecrow, in a business-like tone.
    So, glad to be doing anything that might lead to the end of their captivity, the friends separated to wander over the palace in search of fitting material to use in the construction of their aerial machine.
   

When the adventurers reassembled upon the roof it was found that a remarkably queer assortment of articles had been selected by the various members of the party. No one seemed to have a very clear idea of what was required, but all had brought something.
    The Woggle-Bug had taken from its position over the mantle-piece in the great hallway the head of a Gump, which was adorned with wide-spreading antlers; and this, with great care and greater difficulty, the insect had carried up the stairs to the roof. This Gump resembled an Elk's head, only the nose turned upward in a saucy manner and there were whiskers
    upon its chin, like those of a billy-goat. Why the Woggle-Bug selected this article he could not have explained, except that it had aroused his curiosity.
    Tip, with the aid of the Saw-Horse, had brought a large, upholstered sofa to the roof. It was an oldfashioned piece of furniture, with high back and ends, and it was so heavy that even by resting the greatest weight upon the back of the Saw-Horse, the boy found himself out of breath when at last the clumsy sofa was dumped upon the roof.
    The Pumpkinhead had brought a broom, which was the first thing he saw. The Scarecrow arrived with a coil of clothes-lines and ropes which he had taken from the courtyard, and in his trip up the stairs he had become so entangled in the loose ends of the ropes that both he and his burden tumbled in a heap upon the roof and might have rolled off if Tip had not rescued him.
    The Tin Woodman appeared last. He also had been to the courtyard, where he had cut four great, spreading leaves from a huge palm-tree that was the pride of all the inhabitants of the Emerald City.
    "My dear Nick!" exclaimed the Scarecrow, seeing what his friend had done; "you have been guilty of the greatest crime any person can commit in the Emerald City. If I remember rightly, the

penalty for chopping leaves from the royal palm-tree is to be killed seven times and afterward imprisoned for life."
    "It cannot be helped now" answered the Tin Woodman, throwing down the big leaves upon the roof. "But it may be one more reason why it is necessary for us to escape. And now let us see what you have found for me to work with."
    Many were the doubtful looks cast upon the heap of miscellaneous material that now cluttered the roof, and finally the Scarecrow shook his head and remarked:
    "Well, if friend Nick can manufacture, from this mess of rubbish, a Thing that will fly through the air and carry us to safety, then I will acknowledge him to be a better mechanic than I suspected."
    But the Tin Woodman seemed at first by no means sure of his powers, and only after polishing his forehead vigorously with the chamois-leather did he resolve to undertake the task.
    "The first thing required for the machine," said he, "is a body big enough to carry the entire party. This sofa is the biggest thing we have, and might be used for a body. But, should the machine ever tip sideways, we would all slide off and fall to the ground."
    "Why not use two sofas?" asked Tip. "There's another one just like this down stairs."
    "That is a very sensible suggestion," exclaimed the Tin Woodman. "You must fetch the other sofa at once."
    So Tip and the Saw-Horse managed, with much labor, to get the second sofa to the roof; and when the two were placed together, edge to edge, the backs and ends formed a protecting rampart all around the seats.
    "Excellent!" cried the Scarecrow. "We can ride within this snug nest quite at our ease."
    The two sofas were now bound firmly together with ropes and clothes-lines, and then Nick Chopper fastened the Gump's head to one end.
    "That will show which is the front end of the Thing," said he, greatly pleased with the idea." And, really, if you examine it critically, the Gump looks very well as a figure-head. These great palm-leaves, for which I have endangered my life seven times, must serve us as wings."
    "Are they strong enough?" asked the boy.
    "They are as strong as anything we can get," answered the Woodman; "and although they are not in proportion to the Thing's body, we are not in a position to be very particular."
    So he fastened the palm-leaves to the sofas, two on each side.
    Said the Woggle-Bug, with considerable admiration:
    "The Thing is now complete, and only needs to be brought to life."
    "Stop a moment!" exclaimed Jack." Are you not going to use my broom?"
    "What for?" asked the Scarecrow.
    "Why, it can be fastened to the back end for a tail," answered the Pumpkinhead. "Surely you would not call the Thing complete without a tail."
    "Hm!" said the Tin Woodman, "I do not see the use of a tail. We are not trying to copy a beast, or a fish, or a bird. All we ask of the Thing is to carry us through the air.
    "Perhaps, after the Thing is brought to life, it can use a tail to steer with," suggested the Scarecrow. "For if it flies through the air it will not be unlike a bird, and I've noticed that all birds have tails, which they use for a rudder while flying."
    "Very well," answered Nick, "the broom shall be used for a tail," and he fastened it firmly to the back end of the sofa body.
    Tip took the pepper-box from his pocket.
    "The Thing looks very big," said he, anxiously;
    "and I am not sure there is enough powder left to bring all of it to life. But I'll make it go as far as possible."
    "Put most on the wings," said Nick Chopper; "for they must be made as strong as possible."
    "And don't forget the head!" exclaimed the Woggle-Bug.
    "Or the tail!" added Jack Pumpkinhead.
    "Do be quiet," said Tip, nervously; "you must give me a chance to work the magic charm in the proper manner."
    Very carefully he began sprinkling the Thing with the precious powder. Each of the four wings was first lightly covered with a layer. then the sofas were sprinkled, and the broom given a slight coating.
    "The head! The head! Don't, I beg of you, forget the head!" cried the Woggle-Bug, excitedly.
    "There's only a little of the powder left," announced Tip, looking within the box." And it seems to me it is more important to bring the legs of the sofas to life than the head."
    "Not so," decided the Scarecrow. "Every thing must have a head to direct it; and since this creature is to fly, and not walk, it is really unimportant whether its legs are alive or not."
    So Tip abided by this decision and sprinkled the Gump's head with the remainder of the powder.
    "Now" said he, "keep silence while I work the, charm!"
    Having heard old Mombi pronounce the magic words, and having also succeeded in bringing the Saw-Horse to life, Tip did not hesitate an instant in speaking the three cabalistic words, each accompanied by the peculiar gesture of the hands.
    It was a grave and impressive ceremony.
    As he finished the incantation the Thing shuddered throughout its huge bulk, the Gump gave the screeching cry that is familiar to those animals, and then the four wings began flopping furiously.
    Tip managed to grasp a chimney, else he would have been blown off the roof by the terrible breeze raised by the wings. The Scarecrow, being light in weight, was caught up bodily and borne through the air until Tip luckily seized him by one leg and held him fast. The Woggle-Bug lay flat upon the roof and so escaped harm,
    and the Tin Woodman, whose weight of tin anchored him firmly, threw both arms around Jack Pumpkinhead and managed to save him. The Saw-Horse toppled over upon his back and lay with his legs waving helplessly above him.
    And now, while all were struggling to recover themselves, the Thing rose slowly from the roof and mounted into the air.
    "Here! Come back!" cried Tip, in a frightened voice, as he clung to the chimney with one hand and the Scarecrow with the other. "Come back at once, I command you!"
    It was now that the wisdom of the Scarecrow, in bringing the head of the Thing to life instead of the legs, was proved beyond a doubt. For the Gump, already high in the air, turned its head at Tip's command and gradually circled around until it could view the roof of the palace.
    "Come back!" shouted the boy, again.
    And the Gump obeyed, slowly and gracefully waving its four wings in the air until the Thing had settled once more upon the roof and become still.
   

"This," said the Gump, in a squeaky voice not at all proportioned to the size of its great body, "is the most novel experience I ever heard of. The last thing I remember distinctly is walking through the forest and hearing a loud noise. Something probably killed me then, and it certainly ought to have been the end of me. Yet here I am, alive again, with four monstrous wings and a body which I venture to say would make any respectable animal or fowl weep with shame to own. What does it all mean? Am I a Gump, or am I a juggernaut?" The creature, as it spoke, wiggled its chin whiskers in a very comical manner.
   
       "You're just a Thing," answered Tip, "with a Gump's head on it. And we have made you and brought you to life so that you may carry us through the air wherever we wish to go."
    "Very good!" said the Thing. "As I am not a Gump, I cannot have a Gump's pride or independent spirit. So I may as well become your servant as anything else. My only satisfaction is that I do not seem to have a very strong constitution, and am not likely to live long in a state of slavery."
    "Don't say that, I beg of you!" cried the Tin Woodman, whose excellent heart was strongly affected by this sad speech." Are you not feeling well today?"
    "Oh, as for that," returned the Gump, "it is my first day of existence; so I cannot Judge whether I am feeling well or ill." And it waved its broom tail to and fro in a pensive manner.
    "Come, come!" said the Scarecrow, kindly. "do try, to be more cheerful and take life as you find it. We shall be kind masters, and will strive to render your existence as pleasant as possible. Are you willing to carry us through the air wherever we wish to go?"
    "Certainly," answered the Gump. "I greatly prefer to navigate the air. For should I travel on the earth and meet with one of my own species, my embarrassment would be something awful!"
    "I can appreciate that," said the Tin Woodman, sympathetically.
    "And yet," continued the Thing, "when I carefully
    look you over, my masters, none of you seems to be constructed much more artistically than I am."
    "Appearances are deceitful," said the Woggle-Bug, earnestly. "I am both Highly Magnified and Thoroughly Educated."
    "Indeed!" murmured the Gump, indifferently.
    "And my brains are considered remarkably rare specimens," added the Scarecrow, proudly.
    "How strange!" remarked the Gump.
    "Although I am of tin," said the Woodman, "I own a heart altogether the warmest and most admirable in the whole world."
    "I'm delighted to hear it," replied the Gump, with a slight cough.
    "My smile," said Jack Pumpkinhead, "is worthy your best attention. It is always the same."
    "Semper idem," explained the Woggle-Bug, pompously; and the Gump turned to stare at him.
    "And I," declared the Saw-Horse, filling in an awkward pause, "am only remarkable because I can't help it."
    "I am proud, indeed, to meet with such exceptional masters," said the Gump, in a careless tone. "If I could but secure so complete an introduction to myself, I would be more than satisfied."
    "That will come in time," remarked the Scare- crow. "To 'Know Thyself' is considered quite an accomplishment, which it has taken us, who are your elders, months to perfect. But now," he added, turning to the others, "let us get aboard and start upon our journey."
    "Where shall we go?" asked Tip, as he clambered to a seat on the sofas and assisted the Pumpkinhead to follow him
    "In the South Country rules a very delightful Queen called Glinda the Good, who I am sure will gladly receive us," said the Scarecrow, getting into the Thing clumsily. "Let us go to her and ask her advice."
    "That is cleverly thought of," declared Nick Chopper, giving the Woggle-Bug a boost and then toppling the Saw-Horse into the rear end of the cushioned seats." I know Glinda the Good, and believe she will prove a friend indeed."
    "Are we all ready?" asked the boy.
    "Yes," announced the Tin Woodman, seating himself beside the Scarecrow.
    "Then," said Tip, addressing the Gump, "be kind enough to fly with us to the Southward; and do not go higher than to escape the houses and trees, for it makes me dizzy to be up so far."
    "All right," answered the Gump, briefly.
    It flopped its four huge wings and rose slowly into the air; and then, while our little band of adventurers clung to the backs and sides of the sofas for support, the Gump turned toward the South and soared swiftly and majestically away.
   

 John R. Neill
illustration for The Marvelous Land of Oz by Frank Baum depicting 
our little band of adventurers clung to the backs and sides of the sofas for
support, the Gump turned toward the South and soared swiftly and
majestically away.

our little band of adventurers clung to the backs and sides of the sofas for support, the Gump turned toward the South and soared swiftly and majestically away.

"The scenic effect, from this altitude, is marvelous," commented the educated Woggle-Bug, as they rode along.
    "Never mind the scenery," said the Scarecrow. "Hold on tight, or you may get a tumble. The Thing seems to rock badly.'
    "It will be dark soon," said Tip, observing that the sun was low on the horizon. "Perhaps we should have waited until morning. I wonder if the Gump can fly in the night."
    "I've been wondering that myself," returned the Gump quietly. "You see, this is a new experience to me. I used to have legs that carried me swiftly over the ground. But now my legs feel as if they were asleep."
    "They are," said Tip. "We didn't bring 'em to life."
    "You're expected to fly," explained the Scarecrow. "not to walk."
    "We can walk ourselves," said the Woggle-Bug." I begin to understand what is required of me," remarked the Gump; "so I will do my best to please you," and he flew on for a time in silence.
    Presently Jack Pumpkinhead became uneasy.
    "I wonder if riding through the air is liable to spoil pumpkins," he said.
    "Not unless you carelessly drop your head over the side," answered the Woggle-Bug. "In that event your head would no longer be a pumpkin, for it would become a squash."
    "Have I not asked you to restrain these unfeeling jokes?" demanded Tip, looking at the Woggle-Bug with a severe expression.
    "You have; and I've restrained a good many of them," replied the insect. "But there are opportunities for so many excellent puns in our language that, to an educated person like myself, the temptation to express them is almost irresistible."
    "People with more or less education discovered those puns centuries ago," said Tip.
    "Are you sure?" asked the Woggle-Bug, with a startled look.
    "Of course I am," answered the boy. "An educated Woggle-Bug may be a new thing; but a Woggle-Bug education is as old as the hills, judging from the display you make of it." The insect seemed much impressed by this remark, and for a time maintained a meek silence.
The Scarecrow, in shifting his seat, saw upon the cushions the pepper-box which Tip had cast aside, and began to examine it.
    "Throw it overboard," said the boy; "it's quite empty now, and there's no use keeping it."
    "Is it really empty?" asked the Scarecrow, looking curiously into the box.
    "Of course it is," answered Tip. "I shook out every grain of the powder.
    "Then the box has two bottoms," announced the Scarecrow, "for the bottom on the inside is fully an inch away from the bottom on the outside."
    "Let me see," said the Tin Woodman, taking the box from his friend. "Yes," he declared, after looking it over, "the thing certainly has a false bottom. Now, I wonder what that is for?"
    "Can't you get it apart, and find out?" enquired Tip, now quite interested in the mystery.
    "Why, yes; the lower bottom unscrews," said the Tin Woodman. "My fingers are rather stiff; please see if you can open it."
    He handed the pepper-box to Tip, who had no difficulty in unscrewing the bottom. And in the cavity below were three silver pills, with a carefully folded paper lying underneath them.
    This paper the boy proceeded to unfold, taking
    care not to spill the pills, and found several lines clearly written in red ink.
    "Read it aloud," said the Scarecrow. so Tip read, as follows:
    "DR. NIKIDIK'S CELEBRATED WISHING PILLS.
    "Directions for Use: Swallow one pill; count seventeen by twos; then make a Wish.
    -The Wish will immediately be granted. CAUTION: Keep in a Dry and Dark Place."
    "Why, this is a very valuable discovery!" cried the Scarecrow.
    "It is, indeed," replied Tip, gravely. "These pills may be of great use to us. I wonder if old Mombi knew they were in the bottom of the pepper-box. I remember hearing her say that she got the Powder of Life from this same Nikidik."
    "He must be a powerful Sorcerer!" exclaimed the Tin Woodman; "and since the powder proved a success we ought to have confidence in the pills."
    "But how," asked the Scarecrow, "can anyone count seventeen by twos? Seventeen is an odd number."
    "That is true," replied Tip, greatly disappointed. "No one can possibly count seventeen by twos."
    "Then the pills are of no use to us," wailed the Pumpkinhead; "and this fact overwhelms me with grief. For I had intended wishing that my head would never spoil."
    "Nonsense!" said the Scarecrow, sharply. "If we could use the pills at all we would make far better wishes than that."
    "I do not see how anything could be better," protested poor Jack. "If you were liable to spoil at any time you could understand my anxiety."
    "For my part," said the Tin Woodman, "I sympathize with you in every respect. But since we cannot count seventeen by twos, sympathy is all you are liable to get."
    By this time it had become quite dark, and the voyagers found above them a cloudy sky, through which the rays of the moon could not penetrate.
    The Gump flew steadily on, and for some reason the huge sofa-body rocked more and more dizzily every hour.
    The Woggle-Bug declared he was sea-sick; and Tip was also pale and somewhat distressed. But the others clung to the backs of the sofas and did not seem to mind the motion as long as they were not tipped out.
    Darker and darker grew the night, and on and on sped the Gump through the black heavens. The travelers could not even see one another, and an oppressive silence settled down upon them.
    After a long time Tip, who had been thinking deeply, spoke.
    "How are we to know when we come to the pallace of Glinda the Good?" he asked.
    "It's a long way to Glinda's palace," answered the Woodman; "I've traveled it."
    "But how are we to know how fast the Gump is flying?" persisted the boy. "We cannot see a single thing down on the earth, and before morning we may be far beyond the place we want to reach."
    "That is all true enough," the Scarecrow replied, a little uneasily. "But I do not see how we can stop just now; for we might alight in a river, or on, the top of a steeple; and that would be a great disaster."
    So they permitted the Gump to fly on, with regular flops of its great wings, and waited patiently for morning.
    Then Tip's fears were proven to be well founded; for with the first streaks of gray dawn they looked over the sides of the sofas and discovered rolling plains dotted with queer villages, where the houses, instead of being dome- shaped -- as they all are in the Land of Oz -- had slanting roofs that rose to a peak in the center. Odd looking animals were also moving about upon the open plains, and the country was unfamiliar to both the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow, who had formerly visited Glinda the Good's domain and knew it well.
    "We are lost!" said the Scarecrow, dolefully. "The Gump must have carried us entirely out of the Land of Oz and over the sandy deserts and into the terrible outside world that Dorothy told us about."
    "We must get back," exclaimed the Tin Woodman, earnestly. "we must get back as soon as possible!"
    "Turn around!" cried Tip to the Gump. "turn as quickly as you can!"
    "If I do I shall upset," answered the Gump. "I'm not at all used to flying, and the best plan would be for me to alight in some place, and then I can turn around and take a fresh start."
    Just then, however, there seemed to be no stopping-place that would answer their purpose. They flew over a village so big that the Woggle-Bug declared it was a city. and then they came to a range of high mountains with many deep gorges and steep cliffs showing plainly.
    "Now is our chance to stop," said the boy, finding they were very close to the mountain tops. Then he turned to the Gump and commanded: "Stop at the first level place you see!"
    "Very well," answered the Gump, and settled down upon a table of rock that stood between two cliffs.
    But not being experienced in such matters, the Gump did not judge his speed correctly; and instead of coming to a stop upon the flat rock he missed it by half the width of his body, breaking off both his right wings against the sharp edge of the rock and then tumbling over and over down the cliff.
    Our friends held on to the sofas as long as they could, but when the Gump caught on a proJecting rock the Thing stopped suddenly -- bottom side up -- and all were immediately dumped out.
    By good fortune they fell only a few feet; for underneath them was a monster nest, built by a colony of Jackdaws in a hollow ledge of rock; so none of them -- not even the Pumpkinhead -- was injured by the fall. For Jack found his precious head resting on the soft breast of the Scarecrow, which made an excellent cushion; and Tip fell on a mass of leaves and papers, which saved him from injury. The Woggle-Bug had bumped his round head against
   

 John R. Neill
illustration for The Marvelous Land of Oz by Frank Baum depicting 
Our friends held on to the sofas as long as they could, but when the Gump caught on a proJecting rock the Thing stopped suddenly -- bottom side up -- and all were immediately dumped out.

Our friends held on to the sofas as long as they could, but when the Gump caught on a proJecting rock the Thing stopped suddenly -- bottom side up -- and all were immediately dumped out.

the Saw-Horse, but without causing him more than a moment's inconvenience.
    The Tin Woodman was at first much alarmed; but finding he had escaped without even a scratch upon his beautiful nickle-plate he at once regained his accustomed cheerfulness and turned to address his comrades.
    "Our Journey had ended rather suddenly," said he; "and we cannot justly blame our friend the Gump for our accident, because he did the best he could under the circumstances. But how we are ever to escape from this nest I must leave to someone with better brains than I possess."
    Here he gazed at the Scarecrow; who crawled to the edge of the nest and looked over. Below them was a sheer precipice several hundred feet in depth. Above them was a smooth cliff unbroken save by the point of rock where the wrecked body of the Gump still hung suspended from the end of one of the sofas. There really seemed to be no means of escape, and as they realized their helpless plight the little band of adventurers gave way to their bewilderment.
    "This is a worse prison than the palace," sadly remarked the Woggle-Bug.
    "I wish we had stayed there," moaned Jack.
    "I'm afraid the mountain air isn't good for pumpkins."
    "It won't be when the Jackdaws come back," growled the Saw-Horse, which lay waving its legs in a vain endeavor to get upon its feet again. "Jackdaws are especially fond of pumpkins."
    "Do you think the birds will come here?" asked Jack, much distressed.
    "Of course they will," said Tip; "for this is their nest. And there must be hundreds of them," he continued, "for see what a lot of things they have brought here!"
    Indeed, the nest was half filled with a most curious collection of small articles for which the birds could have no use, but which the thieving Jackdaws had stolen during many years from the homes of men. And as the nest was safely hidden where no human being could reach it, this lost property would never be recovered.
    The Woggle-Bug, searching among the rubbish -- for the Jackdaws stole useless things as well as valuable ones -- turned up with his foot a beautiful diamond necklace. This was so greatly admired by the Tin Woodman that the Woggle-Bug presented it to him with a graceful speech, after which the Woodman hung it around his neck with much pride,

 John R. Neill
illustration for The Marvelous Land of Oz by Frank Baum depicting 
The Woggle-Bug, searching among the rubbish -- for the Jackdaws stole useless things as well as valuable ones -- turned up with his foot a beautiful diamond necklace.

The Woggle-Bug, searching among the rubbish -- for the Jackdaws stole useless things as well as valuable ones -- turned up with his foot a beautiful diamond necklace.

rejoicing exceedingly when the big diamonds glittered in the sun's rays.
    But now they heard a great jabbering and flopping of wings, and as the sound grew nearer to them Tip exclaimed:
    "The Jackdaws are coming! And if they find us here they will surely kill us in their anger."
    "I was afraid of this!" moaned the Pumpkinhead. "My time has come!"
    "And mine, also!" said the Woggle-Bug; "for Jackdaws are the greatest enemies of my race."
    The others were not at all afraid; but the Scarecrow at once decided to save those of the party who were liable to be injured by the angry birds. So he commanded Tip to take off Jack's head and lie down with it in the bottom of the nest, and when this was done he ordered the Woggle-Bug to lie beside Tip. Nick Chopper, who knew from past experience Just what to do, then took the Scarecrow to pieces (all except his head) and scattered the straw over Tip and the Woggle-Bug, completely covering their bodies.
    Hardly had this been accomplished when the flock of Jackdaws reached them. Perceiving the intruders in their nest the birds flew down upon them with screams of rage.