Select Background & Text

   http://classics-illustrated.com

"The Marvelous Land of Oz"


Part III


John R. Neill illustration for The Marvelous Land of Oz by Frank Baum depicting While they paused, hesitating and wondering, the Tin Woodman uttered a cry of impatience and advanced with swinging axe to cut down the stalks before him. But now the sunflowers suddenly stopped their rapid whirling, and the travelers plainly saw a girl's face appear in the center of each flower.

While they paused, hesitating and wondering, the Tin Woodman uttered a cry of impatience and advanced with swinging axe to cut down the stalks before him. But now the sunflowers suddenly stopped their rapid whirling, and the travelers plainly saw a girl's face appear in the center of each flower.



by L. Frank Baum


Illustrated by John R. Neill




The Marvelous
Land of Oz

Being an account of the
further adventures of the
Scarecrow
and Tin Woodman

and also the strange experiences
of the highly magnified Woggle-Bug
Jack Pumpkinhead,
the Animated Saw-Horse
and the Gump;

the story being
A Sequel to The Wizard of Oz




Part III -His Majesty the Scarecrow - Gen. Jinjur's Army of Revolt -The Scarecrow Plans an escape

    I suppose every reader of this book knows what a scarecrow is; but Jack Pumpkinhead, never having seen such a creation, was more surprised at meeting the remarkable King of the Emerald City than by any other one experience of his brief life.
    His Majesty the Scarecrow was dressed in a suit of faded blue clothes, and his head was merely a small sack stuffed with straw, upon which eyes, ears, a nose and a mouth had been rudely painted to represent a face. The clothes were also stuffed with straw, and that so unevenly or carelessly that his Majesty's legs and arms seemed more bumpy than was necessary. Upon his hands were gloves with long fingers, and these were padded with cotton. Wisps of straw stuck out from the monarch's coat and also from his neck and boot-tops. Upon his head he wore a heavy golden crown set thick with sparkling jewels, and the weight of this crown caused his brow to sag in wrinkles, giving a thoughtful expression to the painted face. Indeed, the crown alone betokened majesty; in all else the, Scarecrow King was but a simple scarecrow -- flimsy, awkward, and unsubstantial.
    But if the strange appearance of his Majesty the Scarecrow seemed startling to Jack, no less wonderful was the form of the Pumpkinhead to the Scarecrow. The purple trousers and pink waistcoat and red shirt hung loosely over the wooden joints Tip had manufactured, and the carved face on the pumpkin grinned perpetually, as if its wearer considered life the jolliest thing imaginable.
    At first, indeed, His Majesty thought his queer visitor was laughing at him, and was inclined to resent such a liberty; but it was not without reason that the Scarecrow had attained the reputation of being the wisest personage in the Land of Oz. He made a more careful examination of his visitor, and soon discovered that Jack's features were carved into a smile and that he could not look grave if he wished to.
    The King was the first to speak. After regarding


    "What don't you understand?" asked the Scarecrow.
    "Why, I don't understand your language. You see, I came from the Country of the Gillikins, so that I am a foreigner."
    "Ah, to be sure!" exclaimed the Scarecrow. "I myself speak the language of the Munchkins, which is also the language of the Emerald City. But you, I suppose, speak the language of the Pumpkinheads?"
    "Exactly so, your Majesty" replied the other, bowing; "so it will be impossible for us to understand one another."
    "That is unfortunate, certainly," said the Scarecrow, thoughtfully. "We must have an interpreter."
    "What is an interpreter?" asked Jack.
    "A person who understands both my language and your own. When I say anything, the interpreter can tell you what I mean; and when you say anything the interpreter can tell me what you mean. For the interpreter can speak both languages as well as understand them."
    "That is certainly clever," said Jack, greatly pleased at finding so simple a way out of the difficulty.
    So the Scarecrow commanded the Soldier with the Green Whiskers to search among his people until he found one who understood the language of the Gillikins as well as the language of the Emerald City, and to bring that person to him at once.
    When the Soldier had departed the Scarecrow said:
    "Won't you take a chair while we are waiting?"
    "Your Majesty forgets that I cannot understand you," replied the Pumpkinhead. "If you wish me to sit down you must make a sign for me to do so." The Scarecrow came down from his throne and rolled an armchair to a position behind the Pumpkinhead. Then he gave Jack a sudden push that sent him sprawling upon the cushions in so awkward a fashion that he doubled up like a jackknife, and had hard work to untangle himself.
    "Did you understand that sign?" asked His Majesty, politely.
    "Perfectly," declared Jack, reaching up his arms to turn his head to the front, the pumpkin having twisted around upon the stick that supported it.
    "You seem hastily made," remarked the Scarecrow, watching Jack's efforts to straighten himself.
    "Not more so than your Majesty," was the frank reply.
    "There is this difference between us," said the Scarecrow, "that whereas I will bend, but not break, you will break, but not bend."

 John R. Neill
illustration for The Marvelous Land of Oz by Frank Baum depicting 
Then he gave Jack a sudden push that sent
him sprawling upon the cushions in so awkward a fashion

Then he gave Jack a sudden push that sent him sprawling upon the cushions in so awkward a fashion

At this moment the soldier returned leading a young girl by the hand. She seemed very sweet and modest, having a pretty face and beautiful green eyes and hair. A dainty green silk skirt reached to her knees, showing silk stockings embroidered with pea-pods, and green satin slippers with bunches of lettuce for decorations instead of bows or buckles. Upon her silken waist clover leaves were embroidered, and she wore a jaunty little jacket trimmed with sparkling emeralds of a uniform size.
    "Why, it's little Jellia Jamb!" exclaimed the Scarecrow, as the green maiden bowed her pretty head before him. "Do you understand the language of the Gillikins, my dear?"
    "Yes, your Majesty, she answered, "for I was born in the North Country."
    "Then you shall be our interpreter," said the Scarecrow, "and explain to this Pumpkinhead all that I say, and also explain to me all that he says. Is this arrangement satisfactory?" he asked, turning toward his guest.
    "Very satisfactory indeed," was the reply.
    "Then ask him, to begin with," resumed the Scarecrow, turning to Jellia, "what brought him to the Emerald City"
    But instead of this the girl, who had been staring at Jack, said to him:


    "You are certainly a wonderful creature. Who made you?"
    "A boy named Tip," answered Jack.
    "What does he say?" inquired the Scarecrow. "My ears must have deceived me. What did he say?"
    "He says that your Majesty's brains seem to have come loose," replied the girl, demurely.
    The Scarecrow moved uneasily upon his throne, and felt of his head with his left hand.
    "What a fine thing it is to understand two different languages," he said, with a perplexed sigh. "Ask him, my dear, if he has any objection to being put in jail for insulting the ruler of the Emerald City."
    "I didn't insult you!" protested Jack, indignantly.
    "Tut -- tut!" cautioned the Scarecrow "wait, until Jellia translates my speech. What have we got an interpreter for, if you break out in this rash way?"
    "All right, I'll wait," replied the Pumpkinhead, in a surly tone -- although his face smiled as genially as ever. "Translate the speech, young woman."
    "His Majesty inquires if you are hungry, said Jellia.
    "Oh, not at all!" answered Jack, more pleasantly, "for it is impossible for me to eat."
    "It's the same way with me," remarked the Scarecrow. "What did he say, Jellia, my dear?"
    "He asked if you were aware that one of your eyes is painted larger than the other," said the girl, mischievously.
    "Don't you believe her, your Majesty, cried Jack.
    "Oh, I don't," answered the Scarecrow, calmly. Then, casting a sharp look at the girl, he asked:

 John R. Neill
illustration for The Marvelous Land of Oz by Frank Baum depicting 
Don't you believe her, your Majesty, cried Jack.

"Don't you believe her, your Majesty, cried Jack.


    "Are you quite certain you understand the languages of both the Gillikins and the Munchkins?"
    "Quite certain, your Majesty," said Jellia Jamb, trying hard not to laugh in the face of royalty.
    "Then how is it that I seem to understand them myself?" inquired the Scarecrow.
    "Because they are one and the same!" declared the girl, now laughing merrily. "Does not your Majesty know that in all the land of Oz but one language is spoken?"
    "Is it indeed so?" cried the Scarecrow, much relieved to hear this; "then I might easily have been my own interpreter!"
    "It was all my fault, your Majesty," said Jack, looking rather foolish," I thought we must surely speak different languages, since we came from different countries."
    "This should be a warning to you never to think," returned the Scarecrow, severely. "For unless one can think wisely it is better to remain a dummy -- which you most certainly are."
    "I am! -- I surely am!" agreed the Pumpkinhead.
    "It seems to me," continued the Scarecrow, more mildly, "that your manufacturer spoiled some good pies to create an indifferent man."
    "I assure your Majesty that I did not ask to be created," answered Jack.
    "Ah! It was the same in my case," said the King, pleasantly. And so, as we differ from all ordinary people, let us become friends."
    "With all my heart!" exclaimed Jack.
    "What! Have you a heart?" asked the Scarecrow, surprised.
    "No; that was only imaginative -- I might say, a figure of speech," said the other.
    "Well, your most prominent figure seems to be a figure of wood; so I must beg you to restrain an imagination which, having no brains, you have no right to exercise," suggested the Scarecrow, warningly. "To be sure!" said Jack, without in the least comprehending.
    His Majesty then dismissed Jellia Jamb and the Soldier with the Green Whiskers, and when they were gone he took his new friend by the arm and led him into the courtyard to play a game of quoits.

    Tip was so anxious to rejoin his man Jack and the Saw-Horse that he walked a full half the distance to the Emerald City without stopping to rest. Then he discovered that he was hungry and the crackers and cheese he had provided for the Journey had all been eaten.
    While wondering what he should do in this emergency he came upon a girl sitting by the roadside. She wore a costume that struck the boy as being remarkably brilliant: her silken waist being of emerald green and her skirt of four distinct colors -- blue in front, yellow at the left side, red at the back and purple at the right side. Fastening the waist in front were four buttons -- the top one blue, the next yellow, athird red and the last purple.


    The splendor of this dress was almost barbaric; so Tip was fully justified in staring at the gown for some moments before his eyes were attracted by the pretty face above it. Yes, the face was pretty enough, he decided; but it wore an expression of discontent coupled to a shade of defiance or audacity.
    While the boy stared the girl looked upon him calmly. A lunch basket stood beside her, and she held a dainty sandwich in one hand and a hard-boiled egg in the other, eating with an evident appetite that aroused Tip's sympathy.
    He was just about to ask a share of the luncheon when the girl stood up and brushed the crumbs from her lap.
    "There!" said she; "it is time for me to go. Carry that basket for me and help yourself to its contents if you are hungry."
    Tip seized the basket eagerly and began to eat, following for a time the strange girl without bothering to ask questions. She walked along before him with swift strides, and there was about her an air of decision and importance that led him to suspect she was some great personage.
    Finally, when he had satisfied his hunger, he ran up beside her and tried to keep pace with her swift footsteps -- a very difficult feat, for she was much taller than he, and evidently in a hurry.
    "Thank you very much for the sandwiches," said Tip, as he trotted along. "May I ask your name?"
    "I am General Jinjur," was the brief reply.
    "Oh!" said the boy surprised. "What sort of a General?"
    "I command the Army of Revolt in this war," answered the General, with unnecessary sharpness.
    "Oh!" he again exclaimed. "I didn't know there was a war."
    "You were not supposed to know it," she returned, "for we have kept it a secret; and considering that our army is composed entirely of girls," she added, with some pride, "it is surely a remarkable thing that our Revolt is not yet discovered."
    "It is, indeed," acknowledged Tip. "But where is your army?"
    "About a mile from here," said General Jinjur. "The forces have assembled from all parts of the Land of Oz, at my express command. For this is the day we are to conquer His Majesty the Scarecrow, and wrest from him the throne. The Army of Revolt only awaits my coming to march upon the Emerald City."
    "Well!" declared Tip, drawing a long breath, "this is certainly a surprising thing! May I ask why you wish to conquer His Majesty the Scarecrow?"
    "Because the Emerald City has been ruled by men long enough, for one reason," said the girl.
    "Moreover, the City glitters with beautiful gems, which might far better be used for rings, bracelets and necklaces; and there is enough money in the King's treasury to buy every girl in our Army a dozen new gowns. So we intend to conquer the City and run the government to suit ourselves."
    Jinjur spoke these words with an eagerness and decision that proved she was in earnest.
    "But war is a terrible thing," said Tip, thoughtfully.
    "This war will be pleasant," replied the girl, cheerfully.
    "Many of you will be slain!" continued the boy, in an awed voice.
    "Oh, no", said Jinjur. "What man would oppose a girl, or dare to harm her? And there is not an ugly face in my entire Army."
    Tip laughed.
    "Perhaps you are right," said he. "But the Guardian of the Gate is considered a faithful Guardian, and the King's Army will not let the City be conquered without a struggle."
    "The Army is old and feeble," replied General Jinjur, scornfully. "His strength has all been used to grow whiskers, and his wife has such a temper that she has already pulled more than half of them out by the roots. When the Wonderful Wizard reigned the Soldier with the Green Whiskers was a very good Royal Army, for people feared the Wizard. But no one is afraid of the Scarecrow, so his Royal Army don't count for much in time of war."
    After this conversation they proceeded some distance in silence, and before long reached a large clearing in the forest where fully four hundred young women were assembled. These were laughing and talking together as gaily as if they had gathered for a picnic instead of a war of conquest.
    They were divided into four companies, and Tip noticed that all were dressed in costumes similar to that worn by General Jinjur. The only real difference was that while those girls from the Munchkin country had the blue strip in front of their skirts, those from the country of the Quadlings had the red strip in front; and those from the country of the Winkies had the yellow strip in front, and the Gillikin girls wore the purple strip in front. All had green waists, representing the Emerald City they intended to conquer, and the top button on each waist indicated by its color which country the wearer came from. The uniforms were Jaunty and becoming, and quite effective when massed together.
    Tip thought this strange Army bore no weapons whatever; but in this he was wrong. For each girl had stuck through the knot of her back hair two long, glittering knitting-needles.
    General Jinjur immediately mounted the stump of a tree and addressed her army.
    "Friends, fellow-citizens, and girls!" she said; "we are about to begin our great Revolt against the men of Oz! We march to conquer the Emerald City -- to dethrone the Scarecrow King -- to acquire thousands of gorgeous gems -- to rifle the royal treasury -- and to obtain power over our former oppressors!"
    "Hurrah!" said those who had listened; but Tip thought most of the Army was too much engaged in chattering to pay attention to the words of the General.
    The command to march was now given, and the girls formed themselves into four bands, or companies, and set off with eager strides toward the Emerald City.


    The boy followed after them, carrying several baskets and wraps and packages which various members of the Army of Revolt had placed in his care. It was not long before they came to the green granite walls of the City and halted before the gateway.
    The Guardian of the Gate at once came out and looked at them curiously, as if a circus had come to town. He carried a bunch of keys swung round his neck by a golden chain; his hands were thrust carelessly into his pockets, and he seemed to have no idea at all that the City was threatened by rebels. Speaking pleasantly to the girls, he said:
    "Good morning, my dears! What can I do for you?"


    "Surrender instantly!" answered General Jinjur, standing before him and frowning as terribly as her pretty face would allow her to.
    "Surrender!" echoed the man, astounded. "Why, it's impossible. It's against the law! I never heard of such a thing in my life."
   

 John R. Neill
illustration for The Marvelous Land of Oz by Frank Baum depicting 
 while General Jinjur and
her mob flocked into the unprotected City.

while General Jinjur and her mob flocked into the unprotected City.

while General Jinjur and her mob flocked into the unprotected City. "Still, you must surrender!" exclaimed the General, fiercely. "We are revolting!"
    "You don't look it," said the Guardian, gazing from one to another, admiringly.
    "But we are!" cried Jinjur, stamping her foot, impatiently; "and we mean to conquer the Emerald City!"
    "Good gracious!" returned the surprised Guardian of the Gates; "what a nonsensical idea! Go home to your mothers, my good girls, and milk the cows and bake the bread. Don't you know it's a dangerous thing to conquer a city?"


    "We are not afraid!" responded the General; and she looked so determined that it made the Guardian uneasy.
    So he rang the bell for the Soldier with the Green Whiskers, and the next minute was sorry he had done so. For immediately he was surrounded by a crowd of girls who drew the knitting-needles from their hair and began Jabbing them at the Guardian with the sharp points dangerously near his fat cheeks and blinking eyes.
    The poor man howled loudly for mercy and made no resistance when Jinjur drew the bunch of keys from around his neck.
    Followed by her Army the General now rushed to the gateway, where she was confronted by the Royal Army of Oz -- which was the other name for the Soldier with the Green Whiskers.
    "Halt!" he cried, and pointed his long gun full in the face of the leader.
    Some of the girls screamed and ran back, but General Jinjur bravely stood her ground and said, reproachfully:
    "Why, how now? Would you shoot a poor, defenceless girl?"
    "No," replied the soldier. "for my gun isn't loaded."
    "Not loaded?"
    "No; for fear of accidents. And I've forgotten where I hid the powder and shot to load it with. But if you'll wait a short time I'll try to hunt them up."
    "Don't trouble yourself," said Jinjur, cheerfully. Then she turned to her Army and cried:
    "Girls, the gun isn't loaded!"
    "Hooray," shrieked the rebels, delighted at this good news, and they proceeded to rush upon the Soldier with the Green Whiskers in such a crowd that it was a wonder they didn't stick the knitting-needles into one another.
    But the Royal Army of Oz was too much afraidof women to meet the onslaught. He simply turned about and ran with all his might through the gate and toward the royal palace, while General Jinjur and her mob flocked into the unprotected City.
    In this way was the Emerald City captured without a drop of blood being spilled. The Army of Revolt had become an Army of Conquerors!

    Tip slipped away from the girls and followed swiftly after the Soldier with the Green Whiskers. The invading army entered the City more slowly, for they stopped to dig emeralds out of the walls and paving-stones with the points of their knitting-needles. So the Soldier and the boy reached the palace before the news had spread that the City was conquered.
    The Scarecrow and Jack Pumpkinhead were still playing at quoits in the courtyard when the game was interrupted by the abrupt entrance of the Royal Army of Oz, who came flying in without his hat or gun, his clothes in sad disarray and his long beard floating a yard behind him as he ran.
    "Tally one for me," said the Scarecrow, calmly "What's wrong, my man?" he added, addressing the Soldier.
    "Oh! your Majesty -- your Majesty! The City is conquered!" gasped the Royal Army, who was all out of breath.
    "This is quite sudden," said the Scarecrow. "But please go and bar all the doors and windows of the palace, while I show this Pumpkinhead how to throw a quoit."
    The Soldier hastened to do this, while Tip, who had arrived at his heels, remained in the courtyard to look at the Scarecrow with wondering eyes.
    His Majesty continued to throw the quoits as coolly as if no danger threatened his throne, but the Pumpkinhead, having caught sight of Tip, ambled toward the boy as fast as his wooden legs would go.
    "Good afternoon, noble parent!" he cried, delightedly." I'm glad to see you are here. That terrible Saw-Horse ran away with me."
    "I suspected it," said Tip. "Did you get hurt? Are you cracked at all?"
    "No, I arrived safely," answered Jack, "and his Majesty has been very kind indeed to me.
    At this moment the Soldier with the Green Whiskers returned, and the Scarecrow asked:
    "By the way, who has conquered me?"
    "A regiment of girls, gathered from the four corners of the Land of Oz," replied the Soldier, still pale with fear.
    "But where was my Standing Army at the time?" inquired his Majesty, looking at the Soldier, gravely.
    "Your Standing Army was running," answered the fellow, honestly; "for no man could face the terrible weapons of the invaders."
    "Well," said the Scarecrow, after a moment's thought, "I don't mind much the loss of my throne, for it's a tiresome job to rule over the Emerald City. And this crown is so heavy that it makes my head ache. But I hope the Conquerors have no intention of injuring me, just because I happen to be the King."
    "I heard them, say" remarked Tip, with some hesitation, "that they intend to make a rag carpet of your outside and stuff their sofa-cushions with your inside."
    "Then I am really in danger," declared his Majesty, positively, "and it will be wise for me to consider a means to escape."
    "Where can you go?" asked Jack Pumpkinhead.
    "Why, to my friend the Tin Woodman, who rules over the Winkies, and calls himself their Emperor," was the answer. "I am sure he will protect me."
    Tip was looking out the window.
    "The palace is surrounded by the enemy," said he "It is too late to escape. They would soon tear you to pieces."
    The Scarecrow sighed.
    "In an emergency," he announced, "it is always a good thing to pause and reflect. Please excuse me while I pause and reflect."
    "But we also are in danger," said the Pumpkinhead, anxiously." If any of these girls understand cooking, my end is not far off!"
    "Nonsense!" exclaimed the Scarecrow. "they're too busy to cook, even if they know how!"
    "But should I remain here a prisoner for any length of time," protested Jack," I'm liable to spoil."
    "Ah! then you would not be fit to associate with," returned the Scarecrow. "The matter is more serious than I suspected."
    "You," said the Pumpkinhead, gloomily, "are liable to live for many years. My life is necessarily short. So I must take advantage of the few days that remain to me."
    "There, there! Don't worry," answered the Scarecrow soothingly; "if you'll keep quiet long enough for me to think, I'll try to find some way for us all to escape."
    So the others waited in patient silence while the Scarecrow walked to a corner and stood with his face to the wall for a good five minutes. At the end of that time he faced them with a more cheerful expression upon his painted face.
    "Where is the Saw-Horse you rode here?" he asked the Pumpkinhead.
    "Why, I said he was a jewel, and so your man locked him up in the royal treasury," said Jack.
    "It was the only place I could think of your Majesty," added the Soldier, fearing he had made a blunder.
    "It pleases me very much," said the Scarecrow. "Has the animal been fed?"
    "Oh, yes; I gave him a heaping peck of sawdust."
    "Excellent!" cried the Scarecrow. "Bring the horse here at once."
    The Soldier hastened away, and presently they heard the clattering of the horse's wooden legs upon the pavement as he was led into the courtyard.
    His Majesty regarded the steed critically. "He doesn't seem especially graceful!" he remarked, musingly. "but I suppose he can run?"
    "He can, indeed," said Tip, gazing upon the Saw-Horse admiringly.
    "Then, bearing us upon his back, he must make a dash through the ranks of the rebels and carry us to my friend the Tin Woodman," announced the Scarecrow.
    "He can't carry four!" objected Tip.
    "No, but he may be induced to carry three," said his Majesty. "I shall therefore leave my Royal Army Behind. For, from the ease with which he was conquered, I have little confidence in his powers."
    "Still, he can run," declared Tip, laughing.
    "I expected this blow" said the Soldier, sulkily; "but I can bear it. I shall disguise myself by cutting off my lovely green whiskers. And, after all, it is no more dangerous to face those reckless girls than to ride this fiery, untamed wooden horse!"
    "Perhaps you are right," observed his Majesty. "But, for my part, not being a soldier, I am fond of danger. Now, my boy, you must mount first. And please sit as close to the horse's neck as possible."
    Tip climbed quickly to his place, and the Soldier and the Scarecrow managed to hoist the Pumpkinhead to a seat just behind him. There remained so little space for the King that he was liable to fall off as soon as the horse started.
    "Fetch a clothesline," said the King to his Army, "and tie us all together. Then if one falls off we will all fall off."
    And while the Soldier was gone for the clothesline his Majesty continued, "it is well for me to be careful, for my very existence is in danger."
    "I have to be as careful as you do," said Jack.
    "Not exactly," replied the Scarecrow. "for if anything happened to me, that would be the end of me. But if anything happened to you, they could use you for seed."
    The Soldier now returned with a long line and tied all three firmly together, also lashing them to the body of the Saw-Horse; so there seemed little danger of their tumbling off.
    "Now throw open the gates," commanded the Scarecrow, "and we will make a dash to liberty or to death."
    The courtyard in which they were standing was located in the center of the great palace, which surrounded it on all sides. But in one place a passage led to an outer gateway, which the Soldier had barred by order of his sovereign. It was through this gateway his Majesty proposed to escape, and the Royal Army now led the Saw-Horse along the passage and unbarred the gate, which swung backward with a loud crash.
    "Now," said Tip to the horse, "you must save us all. Run as fast as you can for the gate of the City, and don't let anything stop you."
    "All right!" answered the Saw-Horse, gruffly, and dashed away so suddenly that Tip had to gasp

 John R. Neill
illustration for The Marvelous Land of Oz by Frank Baum depicting 
Now throw open the gates, commanded the Scarecrow, and we will make a
dash to liberty or to death.

Now throw open the gates," commanded the Scarecrow, "and we will make a dash to liberty or to death.


    for breath and hold firmly to the post he had driven into the creature's neck. Several of the girls, who stood outside guarding the palace, were knocked over by the Saw-Horse's mad rush. Others ran screaming out of the way, and only one or two jabbed their knitting-needles frantically at the escaping prisoners. Tip got one small prick in his left arm, which smarted for an hour afterward; but the needles had no effect upon the Scarecrow or Jack Pumpkinhead, who never even suspected they were being prodded.
    As for the Saw-Horse, he made a wonderful record upsetting a fruit cart, overturning several meek looking men, and finally bowling over the new Guardian of the Gate -- a fussy little fat woman appointed by General Jinjur.

 John R. Neill
illustration for The Marvelous Land of Oz by Frank Baum depicting 
Presently they came to the banks of a wide river, and without a pause the wooden steed gave one final leap and launched them all in mid-air.

Presently they came to the banks of a wide river, and without a pause the wooden steed gave one final leap and launched them all in mid-air.

Nor did the impetuous charger stop then. Once outside the walls of the Emerald City he dashed along the road to the West with fast and violent leaps that shook the breath out of the boy and filled the Scarecrow with wonder.
    Jack had ridden at this mad rate once before, so he devoted every effort to holding, with both hands, his pumpkin head upon its stick, enduring meantime the dreadful jolting with the courage of a philosopher.
    "Slow him up! Slow him up!" shouted the Scarecrow. "My straw is all shaking down into my legs."
    But Tip had no breath to speak, so the Saw-Horse continued his wild career unchecked and with unabated speed.
    Presently they came to the banks of a wide river, and without a pause the wooden steed gave one final leap and launched them all in mid-air.
    A second later they were rolling, splashing and bobbing about in the water, the horse struggling frantically to find a rest for its feet and its riders being first plunged beneath the rapid current and then floating upon the surface like corks.